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The Study of What If: Question of The Week
 

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 Scroll through the questions to find one or two or ... that interest you!  Click on the title of the article to be redirected to the entire article.

 

 

The Untapped Power Of Smiling

 

Mar. 22 2011 - 1:22 pm
By ERIC SAVITZ
Guest Post Written by Ron Gutman

 

 

Smile, smile, smile.

 

 

Recently I made an interesting discovery while running – a simple act that made a dramatic difference and helped carry me through the most challenging segments of long distance runs: smiling. This inspired me to embark on a journey that took me through neuroscience, anthropology, sociality and psychology to uncover the untapped powers of the smile.

 

I started my exploratory journey in California, with an intriguing UC Berkeley 30-year longitudinal study that examined the smiles of students in an old yearbook, and measured their well-being and success throughout their lives. By measuring the smiles in the photographs the researchers were able to predict: how fulfilling and long lasting their marriages would be, how highly they would score on standardized tests of well-being and general happiness, and how inspiring they would be to others. The widest smilers consistently ranked highest in all of the above.   To read the rest of the article, click here!

 

 

By Carolyn Butler
The Washington Post
Monday, February 14, 2011; 8:17 PM

They are the simplest instructions in the world: Sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes, clear your mind and try to focus on the present moment. Yet I am confident that anyone who has tried meditation will agree with me that what seems so basic and easy on paper is often incredibly challenging in real life.

I've dabbled in mantras and mindfulness over the years but have never really been able to stick to a regular meditation practice. My mind always seems to wander from pressing concerns such as the grocery list to past blunders or lapses, then I get a backache or an itchy nose (or both) and start feeling bored, and eventually I end up so stressed out about de-stressing that I give up. But I keep coming back and trying again, every so often, because I honestly feel like a calmer, saner and more well-adjusted person when I meditate, even if it's just for a few minutes in bed at the end of the day.  To read the rest of the article, click here.

 

Meditation Fit for a Marine

New experiments with the military affirm the benefits of mindfulness.  
by Vanessa Gregory (posted on MJ on November 11, 2011@12:19am. In Cover Stories, Mind & Body)
 

Two summers ago at the Marine Corps Base in Quantico, Virginia, a group of reservists prepared for a tour of duty in Iraq. Twelve-hour days were jammed with rifle qualifications, counterinsurgency training, emergency medical courses, and — last but not least — moments spent in total silence. “You’d see men sitting in the lotus position in their field uniforms with rifles across their backs,” recalls Major Jason Spitaletta. The Marines were part of a study, partially funded by the Department of Defense, testing what’s best described to the layperson as meditation’s potential to increase the mind’s performance under the duress of war.

Spitaletta, a psychology graduate student in civilian life, had persuaded his commanding officer to participate after reading a provocative briefing sent to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. In the paper, an ex–Army officer named Elizabeth Stanley illustrated meditation’s effect on emotions, which could help healthy soldiers stay calm and alert in chaotic situations — like the aftermath of an IED explosion.  To read the rest of the article, click here.

 

More Articles...

 

Sam Parnia MD has a highly sought after medical speciality: resurrection. His patients can be dead for several hours before they are restored to their former selves, with decades of life ahead of them...Click here for full article!

New research finds that mindfulness training leads to improved scores in tests of reading comprehension and working memory...Click here for full article!

9/11 and
Global Consciousness
...Posted by David Braun of National Geographic
September 6, 2011 -- By Patrick J. Kiger
Chances are, you probably remember exactly what you were doing on the morning of September 11, 2001, at the moment when you first learned about the attack on the World Trade Center. And if you were one of the millions who stared in horror at the television images of smoke billowing from the crippled towers, you undoubtedly can recall the intense, excruciatingly painful surge of grief and anger and sadness that you felt.
You may be surprised, however, to learn that Princeton University researchers believe that so many people around the world were affected in the same way that their collective mental energy actually altered the operation of computers.
Read more here…

11-Nov-2010
Contact: Steve Bradt
Harvard University
Study finds the mind is a frequent, but not happy, wanderer
People spend nearly half their waking hours thinking about what isn’t going on around them.

Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation

Meditation: An Introduction

Meditation May Increase Empathy

Meditation May Make Information Processing In the Brain More Efficient

Meditation for Health Purposes Workshop - 2008, Executive Summary

Plants 'can think and remember'
by Victoria Gill, Science Reporter, BBC News, 14 July 2010
Plants are able to "remember" and "react" to information contained in light, according to researchers.
Plants, scientists say, transmit information about light intensity and quality from leaf to leaf in a very similar way to our own nervous systems.

Meditation Reduces the Emotional Impact of Pain, Study Finds, Science Daily, June 2, 2010

Abstract Thoughts? The Body Takes Them Literally

Brain scans show meditation changes minds, increases attention

Meditation found to increase brain size

The Role of Spirituality in Healthcare

The Next Big Thing: A New You

How Meditation Improves Attention

Meditation increases brain gray matter


"Are you a prisoner of your thoughts?"

"Cavern of Crystal Giants" --

Dr. Orloff, "How to Protect Yourself from Energy Vampires"
February 10, 2010

"Am I Really -Gasp- a Stress Junkie?"

"6 On-The-Job Stress Reduction Tips"

Practice, Practice: How to Hone Your Meditation Skills
Posted August 7, 2008 | 07:36 AM (EST)

ASH: Daily Doses of Bach and Breathing Lower Blood Pressure

Meditation may fine-tune control over attention

What's Love Got To Do With It?
by Dr. Judith Rich
Ask me a question. Any question. Whatever the question, the answer is Love.

Placebos Advocated As Active Treatments

 

 

 

 

last edited on April 28th, 2013 at 4:25 PM

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